May 24, 2011

May?

The sound of rain bouncing off my open windowsill and thunder in the distance woke me up at 3:45 on Saturday morning. Rolling to the foot of my bed, I quickly shut the window. “What the fuck is this, it’s May? It must be rapture,” I though to myself.

Grey weather in the month of May has kept me inside. Here are some of my favorite shots taken inside during the last month.

These sites take me away from the constant grey and humidity, wholelarderlove.com and grassdoe.blogspot.com.

Sunday morning in Ashley Falls Massachusetts.

I’m ready for the rain to let up. I feel like in back in the Pacific Northwest in February.

Here are some more links,
In The Month of May (Picasa),
The Burning House,
Michael’s blog http://anafternoonwith.com/,

February 8, 2011

Winter


I arrived home in the beginning of January to forgotten Christmas trees, empty Fresh Direct boxes and mountains of garbage along the streets of Manhattan. In the Northeast, the holidays aren’t half-time in the scheme of winter but merely the first quarter. A constant cycle of heavy snowfall and subsequent rain and thawing sets the tempo. Without this baseline of uncomfortable weather, the occasional sunny day in the 40s would be taken for granted.
Here are some of my my photos taken in the last month, during my first winter in New York.
Candy cured bacon.
Newspaper, Columbus Ave.

My Aunt and Uncle’s fireplace in Bala Cynwyd.


Bloody Mary, Peels.

Snow day, Central Park.

Street meat malfeasance.

Allusions to Maine.

Drinks in Williamsburg

A warm day in the East Village.

Yours truly. My friend Alexxa took this photo.

Farmers Market.

Another snow day in Central Park.

At the warm points in the thaw and snow cycle, spring feels right around the corner. The next storm dashes these hopes. We still have two more months left. Now you can call it halftime.

Here are some more links,

January (Picasa),
February (Picasa).

December 9, 2010

Prints



Prints go in frames. They go in albums and hang against the wall. Despite representing the same image as a digital file, they tell a much more tactile and approachable story. As a student of the digital photography and blog era, I mostly experience images through the screen of my iMac. This makes prints all the more impactful.

Recently, I ordered a handful of prints to give to friends and family for the holidays as gifts. Seeing and touching these prints and the happy results from their recipients made me realize that some of my readers maybe interested in ordering prints of my photos.



Here are a few images that I had printed on 8×10 recently shot on a turn of the century butcher block.

I love this Willys. It’s now on my wall.



Prints are availible in in 8×10 ($40) and 11×14 ($80). If you are interested, take a look at my online albums, (Picasa), send me an email (foster.huntington@gmail.com) with the images you are interested in and sizes and I will get back to you with information about payment and shipment.

Here are some more links,
Foster Huntington (Picasa),
Prints (Picasa).

November 9, 2010

From Dawn Till Dusk


I reclined my seat and started to doze as the plane taxied through the fog and rain of Lagurdia International Airport. Like a five year old falsifying a snore in the back seat of the car to get carried into bed by their parents, I disguising my disregard for FAA regulations with an apparent catatonic slumber. Giving up on my returning my seat to its upright position and removing my headphones, the flight attendent moved on. Sliding into a much needed nap, I woke with a jolt some hour and half later as the pilot announced over the PA our initial approach to the Milwaukee area.


Grabbing my backpack from the over head bin, I stutter stepped and spin moved around the stragglers in the ile, eager to end my travels. Leaving my offices on Madison Av some four hours earlier, the cold midwestern air greeted my exposed skin as I waited for the familiar sight of my grandfather’s van. Within a few minutes we were heading north on 57 towards my grandfathers 97 acre farm near Adel Wisconsin.


After an hour chat with my grandfather on our way north and a pleasant reunion with my grandmother as soon as we walked through the door, I headed towards the guest room. Before sunrise the next morning, I rolled out of bed. Greeted by the subtle smell of the wood stove in the next room, I dressed and headed towards the backdoor with my camera in hand.

These photos document my first day spent exploring my grandfather’s farm and shop, from dawn till dusk.

Ten miles to the east, the morning’s sun reflected off the water of Lake Michigan, creating one of the most beautiful sunrises I have seen.


The back of my Grandfather’s Dodge Ram.


Local Suffolks grassing in the cold November morning

All of the license plates my 76 year old grandfather has ever owned.

The inside of his barn.


After a stint raising sheep post retirement, my Grandfather now enjoys his time hunting for antique tools, cleaning and researching them, and subsequently selling the cream on eBay. Check out his Ebay Store.


Red.


A brisk November Sunset.


I shot all of these photos with a Zeiss 35mm F2.0.


Tire tracks compressed by the mornings frost, leaving lasting marks in the recently cut grass.

As the sun sank towards the east, I returned to the very stairs where I started my day, some ten hours earlier. Curiously anticipating the next days estate auction, I found comfort in the periodic dashes to the woodpile and the biting cold of Wisconsin’s november night. Tired from the days exploring, I put up a meek fight against extending my evening, and was in bed before 10.
Here are some more links
Snow Flurries (Picasa),
Follow me on Twitter.